New York Fact-O-Gram #3

Bryant Park. (The New York Public Library is to the rear.)

Bryant Park.
(The New York Public Library is to the rear.)

Here’s another New York City “Fact-O-Gram”: There is a single block within Midtown Manhattan that, at different points in time, has held a park, a reservoir, an exhibition hall, and a library. It has changed as New York City has changed, with each new element within its borders forming a unique and important facet of the lives of the city’s residents. This is a story of change and rebirth within the heart of New York City. This is the story of Bryant Park. Continue reading

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New York Fact-O-Gram #2

Here’s another New York City “Fact-O-Gram”: NYC holds two international records for building destruction. The tallest completed building ever brought down through planned demolition was the city’s towering (and somewhat phallic looking) Singer Building in 1968.

The Singer Building in the distance.

The Singer Building in the distance.

Conversely, the tallest buildings ever brought down through officially unplanned demolition were the “Twin Towers” of the city’s World Trade Center due to Islamic terror attacks on September 11th, 2001.

-Keith V.

New York Fact-O-Gram #1

Ramblings About Houston Street, Bad Spelling, and the Best Deli in NYC.

Houston Street subway.

Houston Street subway.

Sam Houston

Sam Houston

This might blow the minds of people outside of New York City. Here in NYC, there is a road that runs from east to west across the island of Manhattan named “Houston Street.” The wide road extends to the very edges of the island and forms a boundary for the island’s “villages”–East, Greenwich, and West–and is home to the world-famous Katz’s Delicatessen. Given its name, it comes as a surprise to most persons outside of New York City to learn the street is not named after Sam Houston, the legendary hero of Texas. In fact, it is not even pronounced as “HYOO-stən”!

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